Diamond J46-37A, EMERALD, 1.21 CT, F, VVS1

Diamond J46-37A, EMERALD, 1.21 CT, F, VVS1

€ 7,298.53
Attributes
LAB

GIA

Carat

1.21

Measurements

6.63×5.00×3.47

Shape

EMERALD

Color

F

Clarity

VVS1

Cutgrade

Very Good

Symmetry

Excellent

Polish

Excellent

Fluorescence

None

Not mentioned on certificate
Milky

NONE

Shade

NONE

Certificate comment

Clarity grade is based on internal graining that is not shown.

Availability: Only 1 left in stock

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Shipping

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Extra information

LAB

Lab is standing for the laboratory who certified the diamond. Due to their high standards we have made the decision to list only Gemological Institute of America (GIA) graded diamonds on this website. Established in 1931, GIA is the world’s foremost authority on diamonds, colored stones, and pearls. A public benefit, nonprofit institute, GIA is the leading source of knowledge, standards, and education in gems and jewelry. You can visit https://www.gia.edu/gia-about to learn more about what makes this the best laboratory for grading diamonds.

Carat

“Carat” is the weight of precious stones and pearls. It is especially used for weighing diamonds. Carat is one-fifth of a gram or 200 mg. also written as .2 grams. It is a measurement based on the commonly used metric system. So if the diamond is a 5 carat diamond, it weighs 1 gram. A carat is divided into 100 points. If a diamond is half a carat, then it is called a 50 pointer.

Measurements

A diamond’s size is described in millimeters (mm). This is always noted as length x width x depth in mm.

Shape

Diamond shape refers to the geometric appearance of a diamond. Diamond shapes are categorized into two groups: round diamonds and fancy shape diamonds. Round diamonds, also known as round brilliant cuts, are the most traditional diamond shape. Fancy shape diamonds refer to any diamond that is not a round brilliant. 89Diamonds fancy shape diamonds include princess, cushion, emerald, square emerald, oval, pear, marquise, heart and radiant.

Color

All non-fancy diamonds sent to GIA for grading are graded according to GIA’s internationally recognized D-to-Z color-grading scale, with D representing the top end of the scale, as a completely colorless diamond, and Z the bottom end of the scale, representing the obvious presence of a light yellow or brown hue.

Overall, the important thing to remember is that the lower the letter, the higher the grade, and the more valuable the diamond.

Clarity

Because diamonds formed deep within the earth, under extreme heat and pressure, they often contain unique birthmarks, either internal (inclusions) or external (blemishes).

Diamond clarity refers to the absence of these inclusions and blemishes. Diamonds without these birthmarks are rare, and rarity affects a diamond’s value. Using the GIA International Diamond Grading System™, diamonds are assigned a clarity grade that ranges from flawless (FL) to diamonds with obvious inclusions (I3).

Every diamond is unique. None is absolutely perfect under 10× magnification, though some come close. Known as Flawless diamonds, these are exceptionally rare.

The GIA Clarity Scale contains 11 grades, with most diamonds falling into the VS (very slightly included) or SI (slightly included) categories. In determining a clarity grade, the GIA system considers the size, nature, position, color or relief, and quantity of clarity characteristics visible under 10× magnification.

  • Flawless (FL) – No inclusions or blemishes are visible to a skilled grader using 10× magnification
  • Internally Flawless (IF) – No inclusions and only blemishes are visible to a skilled grader using 10× magnification
  • Very, Very Slightly Included (VVS1 and VVS2) – Inclusions are difficult for a skilled grader to see under 10× magnification
  • Very Slightly Included (VS1 and VS2) – Inclusions are minor and range from difficult to somewhat easy for a skilled grader to see under 10x magnification
  • Slightly Included (SI1 and SI2) – Inclusions are noticeable to a skilled grader under 10x magnification
  • Included (I1, I2, and I3) – Inclusions are obvious under 10× magnification and may affect transparency and brilliance
Cut

GIA evaluates a round brilliant diamond’s cut based on seven components – brightness, fire, scintillation, weight ratio, durability, polish and symmetry – to arrive at a GIA diamond cut grade, which ranges from Excellent to Poor. The grade is set by the lowest assessment the diamond receives for five of the seven components. In other words, if a diamond receives a Poor grade for brightness, then the highest its overall cut grade can be is Poor.

Symmetry

Symmetry is graded on a scale from Excellent to Poor based on the presence and visibility of symmetry deviations at 10x magnification.

Polish

Polish is graded on a scale from Excellent to Poor based on the presence and visibility of polish features at 10x magnification.

Fluorescence

Fluorescence is the visible light some diamonds emit when they are exposed to invisible ultraviolet (UV) rays. On a GIA diamond grading report, fluorescence refers to the strength, or intensity, of the diamond’s reaction to long-wave UV, which is an essential component of daylight. The light emitted lasts as long as the diamond is exposed to the ultraviolet source.

GIA studies show that, for the overwhelming majority of diamonds, the strength of fluorescence has no widely noticeable effect on appearance. In many instances,
observers prefer the appearance of diamonds that have medium to strong fluorescence. In rare cases, some diamonds with extremely strong fluorescence may appear hazy or oily; fewer than 0.2% of the fluorescent diamonds submitted to GIA exhibit this effect.

Certificate comment

The ‘Comments’ or ‘Other comments’ section in a grading report is reserved for details that the laboratory wants you to know about yet cannot be properly represented in other sections of the report. This is a quicker way to scout for a specific diamonds since you don’t have to download the report, but you can just simply see the comments beneath this headline.

Not mentioned on the certificate

If we spot any concerns that are not listed on the certificate or in the certificate comments we will mention them in any of the categories below.

Milky

What is a milky diamond? A milky diamond appears hazy owing to microscopic inclusions within the stone. In some instances, a concentration of small inclusions clustered together causes the diamond to look foggy, lifeless and dull. If there is any sign off milkyness regarding the diamond our experts will mention it. This characteristic is never mentioned on the certificate, that’s why we mention it separately.

Shade

Color undertones can be explained in layman’s terms by thinking of them as being the hue and the combination of saturation and tone from the color spectrum. If the grade D represents the absence of any color in a diamond and Z is the most colored, the saturation of color increases progressively as you go down the color scale. Within these progressively higher color saturations in lower colors, you can have different hues of color. The most common and expected undertone hue in diamonds is yellow which is never noted in a lab report. Other hues or undertones besides yellow can also be found, the second most common of which is brown. Although more rare, greenish and grayish undertones also exist. If a diamond has any of these undertones our experts will mention it.